ParabolicStringers

Parabolic Stringers

The parabolic template outlines depicted on the following pages are drawn to scale and are representative of the curvature positioning related to the given blank sizes. All templates are named based on their overall length from end to end. When ordering please specify the specific template to be used based on the finished board length. Any short board template can be used in any blank as long as the template is smaller than the blank itself (this does not apply to fish templates). For example, you can request to use the 6’0 parabolic template in the 6’6EA blank. As a general rule the maximum length template that can be used in a blank will be one size smaller than the blank itself (eg. 6’0 template in the 6’2P or the 6’4 tem- plate in the 6’6EA, etc.) We will only use the same length template in a blank when specifically requested by a customer. All templates can also be used in our Superfused EPS blanks.

Our “stock” parabolic templates can be adjusted in or out in the tail to accomodate a narrower or wider out- line. Be aware that all dimensions from nose to tail will be affected when making this adjustment. Upon request customers may also submit “custom” templates to be kept as private outlines. Custom template set up will be subject to a one-time surcharge.

The most common stringer thicknesses in parabolic blanks are 3/32”, 1/8” and 4mm ply (5/32”). The al- lowed maximum stringer thickness used for the 5’11 Fish and 6’4 Fish outlines is 3/32”.
We suggest using the “natural” rocker in all parabolic blanks whenever possible. Parabolic stringers do not react to (or hold) rocker adjustments in the same manner as when adjusted from a center stringer. For this reason will not guarantee precise tolerances when making “custom rocker adjustments” in parabolic blanks.

Parabolic Polyurethane blanks can also be ordered in colored foam. When ordering colored parabolic blanks with different colored rails we require that you order a minimum of 2 blanks (one of each color) as the colors will be exchanged between the 2 blanks.

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Our Latest photos
Barry Snyder explaining his Torsion Drive design, featuring a split stringer which allows for a flex tail. #BlankCanvas
We give you a #BlankCanvas, you craft your finest work. Tag us and we'll include you in our monthly round-up. The full gallery is on our blog. Here's a sampling from @swopsurfboards @austinsurfboards @bensmith2_1 @besanding @brucejones_surfboards @dcal7 @twinlightsglassing @foamez @jaysurfboards @obamau @mitchsnorth @rozbernjohn @surfboardsbyclutch @rochfort_customs
You saw the spin. Here's the whip. Shaped by Al Merrick @cisurfboards. The Rookie model. 5'11" x 18 3/8" x 2 5/16". 26.3L. Five plug, ridden as a Quad. In case you were wondering. We were. Photo by @toddglaser @surfer_magazine @kellyslater
The updated blank catalog is on USBlanks.com right now. #MadeInTheUSA
Have you tried it yet? #69R designed by @rustypreisendorfer
@sealtooth shapes our #66EA into the Wave Bandit! From the archives. Full vid on our Facebook page. @cisurfboards @quiksilver
@smashddpotato documents the happenings within the #ShedCreep with @dcal7. Follow to stay current with the Jersey shaping scene. @greenlightsurfsupply Keep 'em coming @smashddpotato
Winter is coming. #106A designed by @rawsonsurfboard #PaddleIn
@surfingheritage Photo Archivist Steve Wilkings' pick of the month. "After many months of waiting, the first foam surfboards finally arrived in Waikiki. This was just in time for the Christmas tourist season. The foam surfboards quickly became popular with both beach boys and the local surfers. The following year Dick Metz opened up the first retail surfboard shop on Kapiolani Blvd where he was selling Hobie's foam surfboards." Photo: Russ Maki, Waikiki, December 20, 1958 -Steve Wilkings #tbt